Alexandria, VA 703-746-8708               Washington, DC 202-388-5500

VA Campus

Main Campus-Alexandria, VA 
8305 Richmond Highway, Unit 10A,
Alexandria, VA 22309

Tel: 703-746-8708
Fax: 703 746 8709

info@stmichaelcollegeva.edu


Licenses and Approvals

SMCAH is certified to operate by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), James Monroe Building, 101 N 14th St, Richmond, VA 23219. https://www.schev.edu

SMCAH’s Associate Degree in Nursing is approved by the Virginia Board of Nursing. Department of Health Professions Perimeter Center. 9960 Mayland Drive, Suite 300, Henrico, Virginia 23233-1463.  https://www.dhp.virginia.gov

Downloads > StMichaels Student Catalog – VA | Student Achievement Data-VA | Clery Act Statistics Annual Report-VA

The Nursing Skill Lab is located on the school premises.  It houses four patient bed units for student practice, and a sink and storage area to secure equipment and sharps.  SMCAH’s Nursing Skill laboratory is equipped with the following supplies and equipment:

  • Wound supplies
  • Thoracic torso model for wound care
  • Central line kits
  • Wound drains
  • Medication Cart
  • Pulse oximeter
  • Urinary catheter kits, male or female catheterization trainers
  • Nasogastric tubes, tube feeding equipment
  • Headwall with simulated oxygen, compressed air and suction outlets
  • Assessment equipment
  • Bedside stands
  • Linen Hamper, bed pads
  • Anatomical models:
  • Trach model
  • Surgical arm
  • Seymour buttocks for wound care,
  • Thoracic model for central
  • Suction catheter
  • Sterile Gloves
  • Upright Scale & Pediatric scale
  • Infection control supplies
  • Electric thermometers
  • Chest tube/Water seal suction
  • Model breast and testicles for teaching assessment

A baby mannequin and a pregnancy model to use for maternity are also available in the laboratory. The students have access to three (3) adult patient mannequins. In addition to NOELLE® S550 Maternal and Neonatal Birthing Simulator for labor and delivery simulation, the faculty is currently discussing and looking at the use of simulation to increase student exposure to other variety of clinical experiences such as medical-surgical nursing situations.  The faculty utilizes different teaching scenarios to aid in student learning such  an  IV Pump, NG feeding pump, suction equipment, tracheotomy heads, and medication cart. Equipment and supplies that are used for practice to gain competency are  up-to-date and current. 

Saint Michael College of Allied Health Library and Learning Resource Center is located on the college’s premises. The Library contains approximately about 100 books to support each instructional area covered in the curriculum.  Eleven CD-ROM/Internet workstations provide computerized access to magazines, newspapers, and additional reference materials.  The library is open from 8 am until 8:00 p.m. when evening classes are in session and 8:00am – 4:30pm when there is only day classes.  Hours may vary during term breaks and holidays. The Library/Learning Resources Center (LRC) is a major component of the Saint Michael College of Allied Health which supports the institution’s goals of providing instructional support services to enhance teaching and learning. The LRC aims to achieve this goal by selecting, acquiring, and circulating appropriate learning resource materials and providing the skills necessary to access and evaluate information. The college also subscribes to Wolter Kluwer OVID Database: OVID Nursing Community College Basic Journal Collection http://ovidsp.ovid.com (Login: smcah999l Password: Richmond). This online allied health library provides users with reliable healthcare information covering nursing allied health, alternative and complementary medicine, and much more. The database is designed to meet the needs of researchers at healthcare facilities as well as nursing and allied health programs at academic institutions.  The College also subscribes to Medcom Trainex Nursing series videos available 24/7 to all enrolled students with individual’s login/password access. All students are oriented to computer learning in the fundamentals course. Students use computers to take online exams, including the HESI and ATI achievement and comprehensive exams, which give immediate feedback and rationales concerning incorrect answers.  Students can use computers to take unproctored practice tests and does remediation work, including in math proficiency. Students and faculty use the Internet to supplement resources and do research.

The nursing profession is unique, as a nurse you can work in many different settings, including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, colleges, corporations, home health, and public health.  A nurse can also advance to higher managerial roles, taking on more responsibility as a head nurse, director, and vice president of a healthcare organization. These types of management roles generally require a graduate degree in nursing or health services administration.  In addition, if you further your education, you can become an instructor at hospitals and colleges. You can also move into business positions in the healthcare industry, using your expertise to help manage healthcare services, and assist with development, marketing and quality assurance for corporations.

PN 101 BASIC SCIENCES FOR NURSING 208 Hours

This is the foundation of the Practical Nursing Program.  Content includes Anatomy and Physiology, Basic Nutrition, and Microbiology with special emphasis on infection control.

In Part, I, Anatomy and Physiology, the physical and life sciences are introduced to serve as a basis for understanding the human body.  The structure and functions of each system of the human body are emphasized and how the body maintains homeostasis (128 Hours).

In Part II, Basic Nutrition, food as nutrients and the nutritional needs of the human body to maintain optimum health is accentuated. The role of the nurse in diet modification is also contained in this unit (40 Hours).

In Part III, Principles of Microbiology, students are introduced to the major microorganisms and their effect on the human body. The infectious process with the application of infection control measures used in the work setting is also stressed (40 Hours).

These principles of basic sciences, nutrition, and microbiology will be reinforced and expanded during subsequent courses. Teaching methods include lecture, discussion, projects and laboratory sessions supported by appropriate audio-visual materials. The competency-based format of instruction is utilized.

PN 102 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY 80 Hours

The course is designed to provide the Student with an understanding of the classifications and actions of commonly used drugs. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s responsibility to anticipate, observe and report the effects of drugs on the patient. Calculation of accurate medication dosages is also included. The basic principles of administration of medications are included as well as the policies and methods of administration. Further study of medications in integrated throughout the curriculum.

PN 103 FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 200 Hours

The course is designed to introduce the student to the Practical Nursing Program, and to the broad fields of health and nursing. The student is introduced to selected developmental concepts; the physiological and psychological needs of people, effective communication skills, the principle of psychological nursing and the nursing process. Historical developments, the health care delivery system, legal and ethical aspects of nursing, and care of the elderly are also included.

The course provides clinical experience and laboratory practice in basic nursing principles and skills necessary to render safe and therapeutic care to patients with non-complex nursing problems in hospitals, long-term care and sub-acute health care facilities.

PN 104 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING I 318 Hours

This course is designed to place emphasis on the application of the nursing process and Orem’s self-care Deficit theory as a framework to organize, plan and implement an effective nursing intervention based on identified problems.  Principles of nutrition, pharmacology, and communication are correlated throughout the course.  The concept of total care is introduced in order that the student recognizes that nursing is concerned with individuals as a whole and family unit. A study of selected acute-chronic health care problems is investigated by focusing on the pathophysiology, treatments, including medications, behavioral, and socio-economic interrelationships

Attention is given to the effects of poverty on the health of the individual, the family, and the community. Particular emphasis is given to health problems and cares to clients in an urban community setting. Changes in body systems related to aging are integrated as disease processes are discussed. Experience is provided in the delivery of nursing interventions to adults with minimal physiological alterations in hospitals, outpatient surgical units, and long-term care facilities. Emphasis is directed toward assisting with the formulation and implementation of a nursing care plan reflecting the clinical application of the nursing process. Further study and practice of the preparation and administration of medications are integrated throughout the curriculum. 

PN 105 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II 318 Hours

This course is designed for the student to build on prior learning experiences to further knowledge and skills required in the practical nursing field.  Students will continue to use the nursing process, within the self-care framework, to assists clients in meeting their physiological and psychosocial needs in both sub-acute and acute care settings.   The Learning experience is provided in delivering nursing care to patients and families with multiple medical-surgical nursing problems, which require specialized skills. The student is guided in the application of previous learning experiences to gain insight into the problems of families and the role of nursing and other health-allied occupations. Guidance on this level of progression is expected to lead to more self-confidence, self-direction as a nursing team member in the delivery of health care to individuals, patients, and family groups.  Community hospitals, outpatient, long-term and sub-acute health care facilities are utilized for clinical experience. 

PN 106 MATERNAL HEALTH NURSING 64 hours

This course is designed to provide comprehensive discussions of family-centered care, wellness, health promotion and illness prevention, women’s health issues, and the growth and development of the newborn and the parent.  The information will form a continuum of knowledge that flows from conception to adulthood.  Focus on the systems approach will be used to address physiological illnesses.  The student will continue to use the nursing process within the self-care framework in providing care to the childbearing family. Further emphasis is on the application of the nursing process and the implementation of an effective nursing intervention based on identified problems.  Principles of nutrition, pharmacology, and communication are correlated throughout the course.  The student will spend time in the client care area and will be expected to assume more responsibilities for his/her nursing actions.  Clinical experiences include care of mothers and newborns and are held in in-client and/ or ambulatory maternal/child health settings

PN 107 PEDIATRIC NURSING 104 hours

This combined course is designed to provide discussions of family-centered care, wellness, health promotion and illness prevention, and the growth and development of the child.  The information will form a continuum of knowledge that flows from conception to adulthood.  Focus on the systems approach will be used to address physiological illnesses.  Child health theory is presented within a self-care framework of the nursing process and the implementation of an effective nursing intervention based on identified problems.  Principles of nutrition, pharmacology, and communication are correlated throughout the course.  The student will spend time in the Client care area and will be expected to assume more responsibilities for his/her nursing actions.  Related clinical experiences will take place in the hospital and out-client health care facilities

PN 108 MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 104 Hours

In this course, the student will explore the role of the Practical Nurse as a member of a multidisciplinary team caring for clients with mental health deviations.   Students are introduced to the field of mental health nursing and clients in need of psychiatric or chemical dependency services. The focus is placed on rehabilitating clients to the least restrictive environment utilizing a range of psychiatric and medical services, which reflect the accepted standard of care and are in compliance with statutory and regulatory guidelines.   The course content includes concepts and application of therapeutic communication, current and evolving principles in mental health care, legal and ethical guidelines, and human development needs.  Clinical focus is directed toward a client-centered communication interaction incorporating theoretical mental health nursing principles and attainment of self-care requisites.  Clinical experiences are provided in in-patient mental health settings, with observation at a substance abuse program.

PN 109 Gerontology 120 hours

This course is designed to give the student a broader and deeper understanding of the complex needs of older adults and families with multiple health problems. Its ultimate aim is to assist the student in achieving the program objectives. Emphasis is placed on the concept of body image, the family in an urban community, its role in health maintenance and on the effect of illness on older adults.  The student is guided in the application of previous learning experiences of a self-care framework of the nursing process to gain insight into the problems of families and the role of nursing and other helping occupations.  Long-term and sub-acute health care facilities are utilized for clinical experience.

PN 110 TRANSITIONS IN NURSING 80 Hours

This course is designed to “bridge the gap” between the role of a nursing student and graduate.  Content places emphasis on the ethical and legal responsibilities of the Licensed Practical Nurse, current legislation and regulation that affect the LPN and the leadership and management role of the LPN in the nursing profession.  Theory related to career management, job interviewing, and job retention skills will be included. Learning experiences include lecture, class discussions, independent study and projects, and job search which include identifying appropriate job opportunities, writing a resume and demonstrating an understanding of the interview process.

The policies in the Student Catalog/Student Handbook can be changed at any time during the program to reflect current situations and practice in education and healthcare. The administration is responsible for informing the students at Saint Michael College of Allied Health of the changes promptly. The new policy will be distributed to the students. The student will keep a copy of the changed policy, and a signed copy will be kept on each student’s record.

 

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Nursing
ENGL 101: English (3 credit hours)

Provides instruction in the writing process with a focus on self-expressive and expository essays and includes practice in the conventions of standard written English, reading responses, and incorporation of sources into essays with appropriate documentation. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.

ENGL 102 Research and Literature (3 credit hours)

Provides instruction in the writing process with a focus on persuasive and argumentative essays, and includes practice in developing a distinctive style, methods of effective reasoning, and library and online research. A formal research project is required. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.

BIOL 203: Microbiology (4 credit hours)

Explores the structure, function, and taxonomy of microbes, including bacteria and viruses, and their relationships to health and disease. The format includes substantial laboratory work and written reporting.  Microbiology students are introduced to the major microorganisms and their effects on the human body. The infectious process with the application of infection control measures used in the work setting is also emphasized. This course is composed of 180 hours of class and laboratory.

MAT 111: Basic College Mathematics (3 credit hours)

Provides practical applications of mathematics and includes selected topics from consumer math to algebra. Topics include integers, percentages, interest, ratios and proportions, the metric system, probability, linear equations, and problem-solving. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.

BIOL 201: Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4 credit hours)

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of human anatomy and physiology and the relationships of all the body systems and their functions. The structure and functions of each system of the human body are emphasized with an emphasis on how the body maintains homeostasis. This course is composed of 180 hours of class and laboratory.

BIOL 202: Human Anatomy & Physiology II (4 credit hours)

Continues the study of tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Both BIO 201and 202 are needed for a complete study of the anatomy and physiology of all human systems. The format includes laboratory work. This course is composed of 180 hours of class and laboratory.

NUTR 110: Nutrition (3 credit hours)

This course studies the relationship between human nutrition and health. Topics include digestion and absorption of nutrients, carbohydrate, fat, protein, vitamin, and mineral requirements, additives, food fads, diets, and world hunger. Nutrition, food as nutrients and the nutritional needs of the human body to maintain optimum health is accentuated. The role of the nurse in diet modification is also contained in this course. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.

PSYC 201: General Psychology (3 credit hours). This course is an overview of the field of psychology, the scientific and systematic inquiry about behavior and experience.  Emphasis is on the complex and the diverse processes that direct and influence human activities.  Students will gain an understanding of theoretical frameworks and methodologies that are employed in the study of behavior. This course is composed of 144 hours of class.

PSYC 202: Developmental Psychology (3 credit hours). Presents research and theories regarding human growth and changes throughout the lifespan. Students explore factors that affect personality, cognitive, and physical development from psychological and socio-cultural perspectives. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.

PHR 110: Pharmacology (3 credit hours)

Introduces some of the basic principles of drug actions and provides the student with the foundations of dosage calculations. This course is composed of 135 hours of class and laboratory. Major classifications of drugs and their actions, adverse effects, and application to the nursing process are addressed in this course.

NURS 111: Fundamentals of Nursing I (3 credit hours)

Introduces the basic foundations of professional nursing. The development of critical thinking, nursing process, and fundamental skills will be taught in this class in order to provide students the nursing skills and theory necessary to provide safe basic client care. Basic skills, concepts, models, and information related to health, nursing, communication, and aging are addressed. This course is composed of 135 hours of class hours and to be taken concurrently with N112. (Prerequisites: All science courses, English 101, and Developmental Psychology, all with a minimum grade of “C”).

NURS 112: Techniques of Clinical Nursing (3 credit hours).

This clinical course provides lab and clinical experience and gives the student hands-on clinical experience in support of the theory taught in NUR 101. Techniques move from simple to complex and will parallel the instruction students have learned in theory. It is presented concurrently with N101. This course may be used for the transition course for those students with a current practical nursing license. The course contains 45 hours of laboratory and 100 hours of clinical skills experience (145 hrs.). (Prerequisites: All science courses, English 101, Developmental Psychology, and NURS 111, all with a minimum grade of “C”.)

NURS 211: Medical-Surgical Nursing I (5 credit hours)

Presents concepts and skills related to the nursing care of adults with common acute and chronic health problems. A Basic foundation of health promotion and illness and practice as well as the foundations of medical, surgical nursing will be presented. Physiologic and psychosocial foundations of care will be presented in this course.  These concepts, as well as those presented in nutrition and pharmacology, will be built upon as students study the management of clients with specific system disorders. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in theory and skills both in the laboratory and clinical setting. This course is composed of 135 hours of class/laboratory and 128 clinical hours (263 hrs.). (Prerequisites:  All science courses, Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, ENG 101, NUR 111, and 112 all with a minimum grade of “C”).

NURS 214: Medical-Surgical Nursing II (5 credit hours)

Presents further concepts and skills related to the nursing care of adults with common acute and chronic health problems. Emphasis is placed on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, medical and surgical treatment, and the use of the nursing process to promote needs fulfillment in a variety of clinical and community settings. Health problems for specific system disorders as well as multisystem disorders and disorders which require intensive or emergency care are covered. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in theory and skills both in the laboratory and clinical setting. This course is composed of 135 hours of class/laboratory and 128 clinical hours (263 hrs.). (Prerequisites: All science courses, Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, ENG 101, NUR 101 and112, and  NUR 201, all with a minimum grade of “C”)

NURS 212: Maternal-Child Nursing (8 credit hours)

Begins with a theoretical focus on maternity and women’s and family health. Instruction in gynecology, obstetrics, and care of the newborn will lead in to instruction in holistic care for pediatric clients. Students will build on concepts taught throughout the course and the program and be able to apply these to the care of a pediatric client.  Promotion of wellness, illness prevention, and care of clients with acute as well as chronic illnesses throughout childhood will be taught. This course is composed of 315 hours of class/laboratory, 8 hours simulation Laboratory and 56 clinical hours in a variety of pediatric and obstetric settings (379 hrs.).  (Prerequisites: NUR 111, 112, and 211 with a minimum grade of “C”).

NUR 213: Mental Health Nursing (4 Credit hours)

Students in this course will learn the process of psychiatric nursing.  Theory on mental illness, psychotherapeutic medications, therapeutic milieu, and current trends will provide the foundation for the care of the client with acute and/or chronic psychiatric illness. Content will be presented related to clients demonstrating anxiety, rituals, dissociative patterns, somatization, withdrawal from reality, depression or mania, aggression, pathological suspicion, and abuse of food, chemical substances; and people with characteristic behaviors of borderline or antisocial personality disorder This course is composed of 160 hours of class/laboratory and 40 hours of clinical in a mental health setting (200hrs).  (Prerequisites: NURS 111,112, 211, with a minimum grade of “C”).

NUR 216: Leadership in Nursing (3 credit hours)

This course provides the student with knowledge concerning the new graduate’s entry into the workplace as an RN. Current leadership and management techniques are examined, as are management skills, and the legal, economic and ethical issues which impact the Registered Nurse as a professional. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.  Basic concepts of nursing informatics are presented. The RN’s role in the delegation of responsibilities will be explored. Emphasis is placed on the student’s transition into a professional role. (Prerequisites: NUR 101, 102, 201, with a minimum grade of “C”)

NURS 215: Gerontology/Community-Based Nursing (3 credit hours)

Presents concepts and skills related to the nursing care of older adults with common health problems being cared for in the community as well as in various facilities. Emphasizes physiological changes and diseases processes associated with aging, as well as clinical manifestations, medical and surgical treatment, and the use of the nursing process. Health problems related to the aging process and their effects on various body systems are emphasized. Students are expected to apply theory from medical-surgical nursing and adapt it to health problems in the elderly population being cared for in a variety of settings. This course is composed of 135 hours of class and 40 clinical hours (175 hrs.). Clinical will focus on caring for the elderly client in a residential or community-based setting.  (Prerequisites:  NUR 101, 102, 201, all with a minimum grade of “C”)

NUR 217: Capstone Course (3 credit hours)

This course is set up to meet the specific needs of the student preparing to take the Comprehensive Examination and the NCLEX-RN. The NCLEX-RN Test Plan and application process are explained. A review of nursing theory and test-taking strategies are provided. Hands-on practice with the computer adaptive test-taking method is provided. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.  A standardized RN comprehensive exam will be used as the Final Exam in this course. VATI-RN and NCLEX RN 10,000 are used to help students review for the RN Comprehensive Exit Exam which is part of this course. (Prerequisites:  Students must have passed all program courses with a minimum of 2.5 GPA before enrolling in NURS 217: Capstone and met their financial obligations.)

All nursing courses are offered at Saint Michael College of Allied Health a minimum of twice a year.
ENGL 101: English (3 credit hours)

Provides instruction in the writing process with a focus on self-expressive and expository essays, and includes practice in the conventions of standard written English, reading responses, and incorporation of sources into essays with appropriate documentation.

BIOL 203: Microbiology (4 credit hours)

Explores the structure, function, and taxonomy of microbes, including bacteria and viruses, and their relationships to health and disease. The format includes substantial laboratory work and written reporting.  Microbiology students are introduced to the major microorganisms and their effects on the human body. The infectious process with the application of infection control measures used in the work setting is also emphasized.

MAT 111: Basic College Mathematics (3 credit hours)

Provides practical applications of mathematics and includes selected topics from consumer math to algebra. Topics include integers, percentages, interest, ratios and proportions, the metric system, probability, linear equations, and problem-solving.

BIOL 201: Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4 credit hours)

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of human anatomy and physiology and the relationships of all the body systems and their functions. The structure and functions of each system of the human body are emphasized with an emphasis on how the body maintains homeostasis.

BIOL 202: Human Anatomy & Physiology II  (4 credit hours)

Continues the study of tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Both BIO 201and 202 are needed for a complete study of the anatomy and physiology of all human systems. The format includes laboratory work.

NUTR 110: Nutrition (3 credit hours)

This course studies the relationship between human nutrition and health. Topics include digestion and absorption of nutrients, carbohydrate, fat, protein, vitamin, and mineral requirements, additives, food fads, diets, and world hunger. Nutrition, food as nutrients and the nutritional needs of the human body to maintain optimum health is accentuated. The role of the nurse in diet modification is also contained in this course.

PSYC 201: General Psychology (3 credit hours)

This course is an overview of the field of psychology, the scientific and systematic inquiry about behavior and experience.  Emphasis is on the complex and the diverse processes that direct and influence human activities.  Students will gain an understanding of theoretical frameworks and methodologies that are employed in the study of behavior. This course consists of ten Units present over sixteen weeks

PSYC 202: Developmental Psychology (3 credit hours)

Presents research and theories regarding human growth and changes throughout the lifespan. Students explore factors that affect personality, cognitive, and physical development from psychological and socio-cultural perspectives.

PHR 110: Pharmacology (3 credit hours)

Introduces some of the basic principles of drug actions and provides the student with the foundations of dosage calculations. Major classifications of drugs and their actions, adverse effects, and application to the nursing process are addressed in this course.

NURS 111: Fundamentals of Nursing I (3 credit hours)

Introduces the basic foundations of professional nursing. The development of critical thinking, nursing process, and fundamental skills will be taught in this class in order to provide students the nursing skills and theory necessary to provide safe basic client care. Basic skills, concepts, models, and information related to health, nursing, communication, and aging are addressed. The course is to be taken concurrently with NURS 112. (Prerequisites: All science courses, English 101, and Developmental Psychology, all with a minimum grade of “C”).

NURS 112: Techniques of Clinical Nursing (3 credit hours)

This clinical course provides lab and clinical experience and gives the student hands-on clinical experience in support of the theory taught in NUR 111. Techniques move from simple to complex and will parallel the instruction students have learned in theory. It is presented concurrently with N101. This course may be used for the transition course for those students with a current practical nursing license. The course contains 45 hours of class/laboratory and 100 hours of clinical skills experience. (Prerequisites: All science courses, English 101, Developmental Psychology, and NURS 111, all with a minimum grade of “C” ).

NURS 211: Medical-Surgical Nursing I (5 credit hours)

Presents concepts and skills related to the nursing care of adults with common acute and chronic health problems. A Basic foundation of health promotion and illness and practice as well as the foundations of medical, surgical nursing will be presented. Physiologic and psychosocial foundations of care will be presented in this course.  These concepts, as well as those presented in nutrition and pharmacology, will be built upon as students study the management of clients with specific system disorders. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in theory and skills both in the laboratory and clinical setting. This course is composed of 135 hours of class/laboratory, 37 hours simulation hours and 128 clinical hours.(Prerequisites:  All science courses, Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, ENG 101, NUR 111, 112 and 113 all with a minimum grade of “C”)

NURS 214: Medical-Surgical Nursing II (5 credit hours)

Presents further concepts and skills related to the nursing care of adults with common acute and chronic health problems. Emphasis is placed on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, medical and surgical treatment, and the use of the nursing process to promote needs fulfillment in a variety of clinical and community settings. Health problems for specific system disorders as well as multisystem disorders and disorders which require intensive or emergency care are covered. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in theory and skills both in the laboratory and clinical setting. This course is composed of 135 hours of class/laboratory, 37 simulation hours  and 128 clinical hours. (Prerequisites: All science courses, Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, ENG 102, NUR 111, 112, 113 and NUR 211, all with a minimum grade of “C”)

NURS 213: Maternal-Child Nursing (6 credit hours)

Begins with a theoretical focus on maternity and women’s and family health. Instruction in gynecology, obstetrics, and care of the newborn will lead to instruction in holistic care for pediatric clients. Students will build on concepts taught throughout the course and the program and be able to apply these to the care of a pediatric client.  Promotion of wellness, illness prevention, and care of clients with acute as well as chronic illnesses throughout childhood will be taught. This course is composed of 209 hours of class/laboratory, 16 simulation hours  and 64 clinical hours in a variety of pediatric and obstetric settings.  (Prerequisites: NUR 111, 112,113 with a minimum grade of “C”)

NUR 214: Mental Health Nursing (4 Credit hours )

Students in this course will learn the process of psychiatric nursing.  Theory of mental illness, psychotherapeutic medications, therapeutic milieu, and current trends will provide the foundation for the care of the client with acute and chronic psychiatric illness. Content will be presented related to clients demonstrating anxiety, rituals, dissociative patterns, somatization, withdrawal from reality, depression or mania, aggression, pathological suspicion, and abuse of food, chemical substances; and people with characteristic behaviors of borderline or antisocial personality disorder This course is composed of 160 hours of class/laboratory and 40 hours of clinical in a mental health setting.  (Prerequisites: NURS 111,112,113, 211, with a minimum grade of “C”)

NUR 216: Leadership in Nursing (3 credit hours)

This course provides the student with knowledge concerning the new graduate’s entry into the workplace as an RN. Current leadership and management techniques are examined, as are management skills, and the legal, economic and ethical issues which impact the Registered Nurse as a professional. Basic concepts of nursing informatics are presented. The RN’s role in the delegation of responsibilities will be explored. Emphasis is placed on the student’s transition into a professional role. This course is composed of 135 hours of class. (Prerequisites: NUR 111, 112, 211,212 with a minimum grade of “C”)

NURS 212: Gerontology/Community-Based Nursing (3 credit hours)

Presents concepts and skills related to the nursing care of older adults with common health problems being cared for in the community as well as in various facilities. Emphasizes physiological changes and diseases processes associated with aging, as well as clinical manifestations, medical and surgical treatment, and the use of the nursing process. Health problems related to the aging process and their effects on various body systems are emphasized. Students are expected to apply theory from medical-surgical nursing and adapt it to health problems in the elderly population being cared for in a variety of settings. This course is composed of 135 hours of class and 40 clinical hours. Clinical will focus on caring for the elderly client in a residential or community-based setting.  (Prerequisites:  NUR 111, 112, 113, 211,  all with a minimum grade of “C”)

NUR 217: Capstone Course (3 credit hours)

This course is set up to meet the specific needs of the student preparing to take the Comprehensive Examination and the NCLEX-RN. The NCLEX-RN Test Plan and application process are explained. A review of nursing theory and test-taking strategies are provided. Hands-on practice with the computer adaptive test-taking method is provided. A standardized RN comprehensive exam will be used as the Final Exam in this course. VATI-RN and NCLEX RN 10,000 are used to help students review for the RN Comprehensive Exit Exam which is part of this course. This course is composed of 135 hours of class.(Prerequisites: Students must have passed all level  two courses with a minimum of 2.5 GPA before enrolling in NURS 217: Capstone and met their financial obligations.).

Semesters:  SMCAH length of a semester consists of 15 calendar weeks of instructional and clinical time

Lecture: One lecture credit hour represents 1 hour per week of scheduled class time and 2 hours of student preparation time. Which means 45 hours of class time and 90 hours of student preparation is required for three credit hours per semester.

Laboratory: One laboratory credit hour represents 1 hour per week of lecture or discussion time plus 1-2 hours per week of scheduled supervised laboratory work and 2 hours of student preparation time. Which means 15 hours of laboratory hours and 30 hours of student preparation is required for one credit hour per semester.

Clinical: Four (4) hours supervised student clinical teaching per week is required for one (1) credit hour per 15 weeks semester. 

The policies in the Student Catalog/Student Handbook can be changed at any time during the program to reflect current situations and practice in education and healthcare. The administration is responsible for informing the students at Saint Michael College of Allied Health of the changes promptly. The new policy will be distributed to the students. The student will keep a copy of the changed policy, and a signed copy will be kept on each student’s record.